Breaking Tradition {Christmas Without A Family Tree}

Brightly colored Christmas TreesI shared this picture on Instagram yesterday.  Yes, we have two trees this year (that’s new for us) and yes, they are blue and purple (also new for us).  My kids picked them out, the boy picked the blue one and the girl picked the purple.  They picked their ornaments too.  The decorated their trees themselves, with the exception of the bow on the top, which I tied on for each of them.

In the past, we’ve always had a 7-1/2 ft pre-lit tree (white lights only) with coordinating ornaments (solid colored balls and blown glass hearts/stars), tree skirt, huge bow and matching stockings, decorations for the mantle and all that jazz set up nicely in our family room.  Last year, our very expensive, fairly old pre-lit tree developed a short in one of the light strands.  Knowing that it was getting old and was starting to look less than stellar, we made the decision to pitch it at the end of the holiday season and get a new tree.  A logical person would’ve gone shopping for a tree on December 26th, but sometimes logic eludes me.

Fast forward to this year…

Time to put up the tree rolled around, yet we have no tree.  Allergies dictate that we have an artificial tree.  I looked at some when we were out on Black Friday, yet the idea of dropping $200 on a fake tree just didn’t sit well with me.  Going home empty handed, we made plans to head out tree shopping as a family on Sunday.

I started joking about letting the kids get a purple tree.  Of course, the boy started screaming (quite literally) because he didn’t want a purple tree, he wanted a blue tree!  Of course, I knew we wouldn’t go home with a purple or a blue tree, but a regular green one… one with white lights.  Clearly, things don’t always go as planned.

After rolling into Garden Ridge and finding out that they did indeed have both blue and purple trees (2 shades of blue to be exact – and orange, red and black – and in multiple heights), we had a problem.  I should have known better than trying to joke with my kids.   They are 4 and (almost) 7.  It never ends well.  Ever.

We made a few laps around the Christmas tree block, yet nothing really sat right with me.  I looked at all the trees, ranging from $99 – $299 in price, and just couldn’t see them making my kids as happy as the 4′, brightly colored, $29.99 versions.  My husband and I batted the idea back and forth for a few minutes, and ultimately, we left Garden Ridge with a 4′ blue tree and a 4′ purple tree.  Each child has their own tree, and each is very excited about the idea of Santa piling their gifts around their very own tree.

There’s no big family tree this year.  This is the first time since moving out of my dad’s house that I haven’t had a big tree.  In fact, I haven’t even brought out the mantle decorations or stockings yet this year.  I’m sure I will, but for now I’ll just sit in the glowing blue and purple light of a new tradition.

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3 Responses to Breaking Tradition {Christmas Without A Family Tree}

  1. Sarah Browning says:

    I think that this is a wonderful idea!! How unique!! We have two trees also. One in our den, which is the awful 90% pre-lit Target special from a couple of years ago that my husband bought. Our other tree is a family tree, my mom got before they adopted me. This tree is over 35 years old and still looks pretty amazing. My husband wanted to get rid of it but our daughter swears she is going to use it when she gets older and it would break her heart if we were not to set it up each year… therefore we MUST have both. I totally understand having 2 trees and doing things to make the littles smile!

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